Monday, December 17, 2012

“On the Thought Patterns of the People of Edo”

This just in from Sally Suzuki:
Here is the final draft of your translation. I have fixed all the awkward spots. I hope this pleases you well. And for the blind:




On the Thought Patterns of the People of Edo

By Ishikawa Jun

Translated by R. Shaldjian Morrison

Sakuma’s servant girl, her gold-leafed coiffure all a-frizzle
Word has it she was straddling an elephant just the day before last.
[Removed to prevent plagiarism; translation (by me) forthcoming...]

40 comments:

horagai said...

はじめまして。加藤@ほら貝と申します。
アクセスログで、こちらのサイトからリンクを張っていただいていることを知りました。
ありがとうございます。

「作俑」ですが、手元の漢和辞典に次のようにあります。

1 草木などで人を象った副葬品を作ること。
孔子はこの風習が殉死をまねいたと批判(「礼記」檀弓下、「孟子」梁惠王上)。
2 そこから転じて、悪い前例を作ること。

Ryan said...

加藤先生、

「作俑」の説明、ありがとうございます。私の拙い英訳では、第二義が伝わっていると思うが、どうしても第一義も含めることが出来なかった。両方の意味が伝わる、なんか相応しい表現ないかね。。

まさか加藤先生本人からコメントが来ると思わなかった。今はちょうど加藤先生の『コスモスの智慧』を読んでいるところで、大変勉強になっています。ほら貝にも役立つ情報がいっぱいあって感謝です。

Anonymous said...

Didn't you post this a few months ago?

Beholdmyswarthyface said...

Anonymous,

Yes. I've been visiting family in Phoenix for the last two weeks, and haven't had any time to update the blog, so I thought I'd do a little recycling. I apologize for any confusion I have caused.

Anonymous said...

That's pretty lame. I might just have to stop stopping by this blog.

-Ian Hogarth

BEHOLD MY SCARFACE said...

THE WORLD IS YOURS

Anonymous said...

awkward spots:
-title: use thought processes or something else for hassoho

-change jiyujizai to naturalness

-Your mother

Anonymous said...

Suggestion for next article: Ishikawa Jun, Heidegger and the Authentic Life

-Hannah

Anonymous said...

New discovery: this Hanka Tsuu you speak of is really Ozaki Koyo! Fix it quick!

-Your mother

Anonymous said...

Might that part about "when they emerge from their . . ." be a reference to Plato's Republic-- when the men leave the cave to the surface the Earth, what they find is no longer the bright surface illuminated by the rays of the Sun, the supreme Good, but the desolate "desert of the real"?

-Zizek

Anonymous said...

It's 半可山人 not 半可通人, and therefore has nothing to do with 尾崎紅葉。

-Jeb Horsasi

Anonymous said...

Someone clean this up! It's very very kudoi.

-Joshua Hersch

Anonymous said...

I am certain that only a translator as love-shrewd as Beholdmyswarthyface could have handled this most difficult work.

-Mother

Anonymous said...

Come to think of it, you are also a kind of demi-connoisseur.

-Ian Hogarth

Anonymous said...
This comment has been removed by a blog administrator.
Anonymous said...

Who you calling demi-connoisseur!

-Josh Carthas

Anonymous said...

You might want to change "their free and luminous world vanished in a poof," to "the whole luminous spectacle disappeared." Think about it.

-Danny Graney

Anonymous said...

Note: change "gap" to "rupture."

Anonymous said...

Regarding that part about Nanpo is to . . . as Tsurayuki is to . . .," I think you should change it to "in a process of self-making."

Anonymous said...

part about Kokinshu . . . change to "solid ground for its existence."

-"Little Bird" Boednest

Beholdmyswarthyface said...

include footnote about how hakken can also mean discovery, invention, or construction (eg, Karatani Kojin's fuukei no hakken).

-Your mother

Beholdmyswarthyface said...
This comment has been removed by the author.
Anonymous said...

You might want to discuss Kafu and Ishikawa's shared ideal of "dandyism"-- in the Beaudalairean sense of one who raises aesthetics to the status of a religion (see his "Modern Painters" essay)

-Sally Suzuki, Beholdmyswarthyface Media Director

Anonymous said...

Commentary on this Ishikawa essay can be found in the following:

1. Ch 6 (209-221) of 野口武彦's 石川淳論, on yatsushi no bigaku

2. Ch 1 of 野口武彦's 江戸がからになる日、石川淳論第二.

3. Pages 54-57 and 77-90 of 安藤始's 石川淳論

4. Page 225 of 畦地芳弘's 石川淳前期作品解読。

5. Page 404-420 of 石川淳 ちくま日本文学全集 (with notes!)

Yours,
Sally Suzuki, Beholdmyswarthyface Media Director

Anonymous said...

Don't forget that Shirane Haruo mentions the essay too in his Traces of Dreams:

"Ishikawa Jun, a modern novelist and Edo scholar, regarded the popular folk tale of Otake, the lowly maid who turns out to be a contemporary incarnation of Danichi nyorai (Skt. Mahavairocana), the Buddha of great light, as an archetypal example of such haikai imagination. Ishikawa found the historical precedent for Otake in the Noh play Eguchi in which a prostitute from Eguchi turns out to be the Fugen Bodhisattva (Skt. Samantabhadra). Not only does the profane turn out to be sacred, but a Buddhist deity that had lost some of its power in the Tokugawa period takes on new life and meaning through a lowly, commoner form." (Shirane, 254-255)

Anonymous said...

Also see Horagai's article about it:

http://www.horagai.com/www/jun/rikkyo/200805.pdf

Anonymous said...

maybe talk about Jameson's idea about postmodernism behind the zokka (though not necessarily in a bad sense) of earlier high modernism.

-Your mother

Anonymous said...

Beholdmyswarthyface,

Ishikawa's attitude toward the Edoites reminded me a bit of Nietzsche's attitude toward the Greeks:

Writes Lee Spinks: “What modernity lacks is . . . that sense of aesthetic style, typified for Nietzsche by the Greeks, which combines the interests of public and private life by incorporating into contemporary consciousness only those historical forces that meet the needs of a people. (85)

And again, this time quoting directly from Nietzsche: “Any one who approaches these Olympians with a different religion in his heart, seeking elevated morals, even sanctity, ethereal spirituality, charity and mercy, will quickly be foced to turn his back upon them [ie, the Greeks], discouraged and disappointed” (Nietzsche, Birth of Tragedy? 21-22, or 62 in Routledge)

-Jeremy Pinetals

Anonymous said...

use words "dazzling" and "disorienting"

Beholdmyswarthyface said...

see Deleuze's notions of "minor literature" and "difference" and "repetition" and "eternal return" (Routledge, 118-123).

Anonymous said...

ordeal. device.

Mearle Redne

Beholdmyswarthyface said...

Thank you, Sally. Indeed, this pleases me well.

Anonymous said...

change to "fleeting shadow"

Mother said...

You might want to talk about the philosophy of the "everyday," which was big both in Germany and Japan in the 1930s. Harootunian discusses this in his book, History's Disquiet. Also, Tosaka Jun writes about it, as do a whole range of others, from Yanagita Kunio to ...

Anonymous said...

Hanka Sanjin is Ueda Gyokugai (1781-1839)

Mother said...

use word "epigone" at least once.

Mother Nessiona said...

Consider what Kobayashi Hideo says about "movement" in his 1929 essay "Multiple Designs": "Conceptual aestheticians can explain in precise detail what they see as the structure of art, and they can do so because art signifies for them nothing but various artistic sensations.

Mother Nessiona said...

Empirical aestheticians can draw graphs plotting exactly the assorted laws by which art comes into the world, and they can do so because they regard art as just one among a host of expressive techniques to have surfaced over the course of human history. However, for the artist, art is neither a function of sensation nor a function of thought. It is an activity. For the artist, the work is no more than a signpost marking the distance along the way. What is of value is the walking." (26-27)

Mother said...

use word "transmogrify"

Anonymous said...

hmm-mm! what i wouldn't give for my "own little Otake"! -ralph