Monday, August 25, 2008

Was Andy Kaufman the Dazai Osamu of Jewish-American Comedy?


Watching this Andy Kaufman video after spending most of the day reading Dazai Osamu, I noticed that there are some striking similarities between the two artists. No time to go into detail now, but here are a few of the similarities. I hope to elaborate on this topic at a later date.

a) Both view the audience as an object to be manipulated, and employ similar methods of manipulation.
b) Both present with a straight face a fictionalized self as if it were "the real self."
c) Both deliberately use bad humor, over-the-top pathos, and bathos.
d) Both frequently wallow in self-pity for comic effect.
e) Both incorporate neurotic "self-critiques" into their performances.
f) Both insert into their act from time to time hecklers or critics who mock their performance as it is being delivered.
g) Both often show signs of death wishery (or at least the characters they are playing do).
h) Both perform phony crying routines.
i) Their performative techniques are often thrust into the foreground.
j) And, most importantly, they share a central preoccupation, namely, of problematizing the concept of “self,” and of blurring the lines between performance and reality.

I hope I'm not belaboring the obvious here. Oh, and also, both died young (Dazai of suicide, Kaufman of kidney failure). Perhaps dying young was the only to keep people from saying it was all an act.

東北地方を彷徨う旅行 (in order: Sendai, Matsushima, Sakunami, Yamadera, Yamagata-shi)

日本のマスコミ、物まねオウムに過ぎないのか ~外人たる僕の目から見た日本マスコミ~


【修辞学。レッスン1: 反米感情を煽ること】

              例A:

文学の専門で政治問題はあまり自分の研究に直接の関係がないと去年まで思ってきた私だが、今年元日から日本の新聞を毎朝読むと決心し、この三ヶ月で気づいたことは山々ある。左から右への広い範囲でのさまざまな新聞を読むことで、マスコミ全体が少し見えてくるだろうと期待して、一週間毎に違う新聞を読んだ。

例えば、一方の極端から他方の極端へと変えて行き、先週は『赤旗新聞』だったとすれば、今週は『朝日新聞』を読んで、そして来週からは『讀賣』で再来週からは『産経』、とした。この循環を何度も繰り返せば、たいてい日本マスコミの傾向が分かってくるだろうと期待していた。何がタブーなのか、情報や表現の自由はどの程度か、これらの疑問点が少しずつ解けていくことを目指したわけである。

そしてちょうど三カ月がたった今、この期間で気づいたことを以下に述べる。

第一。『産経』にせよ『朝日』にせよ、国際ニュースにおいては、何の変わりもなきに等しいことに気づいた。『赤旗新聞』を除き、どの新聞も大体同じ内容で、何らかの相違があるとしても、それは国内問題に関する社説などに限られている。誰かに命令が下されているかのように、国際や米国に関しての報道は、必ずアメリカのマスコミと一致する。ボスニア内戦、イラク侵略戦争、チベット対中国の紛争、イスラエルのパレスチナ占領、アメリカの日本永久占領、あるいはアメリカの世界諸国への介入などの問題の扱いに見られるように、すべての国際問題に関して、日本マスコミの表現や見解は、なぜか必ず米国マスコミと一致するのである(この事実は、もちろん自分の発見ではないが)。

これは確かに偶然ではない。十年ほど前の『ニューヨーク・タイムズ』が暴露した記事で、戦後の日本では、米国のCIA(中央情報局)から資金援助を受ける見返りとして、自民党はマスコミ報道機関の自由を制限すると約束したことが分かった。 その記事によると、自民党が50年代から70年代までずっと資金援助を受け続けていたが、それ以来は受けていない。にもかかわらず、当時からの思想取り締りが未だに残っているのは一体なぜか。

この一貫した世界観はどこから生まれるか。情報の出所を探れば、きっと『ニューヨーク・タイムズ』や『ウォール・ストリート・ジャーナル』に辿りつくだろう。大ざっぱな言い方かもしれないが、諸親米国の世界観は、この二つの大規模な通信社で製造されているように見える。そしてそこで作られた物語が多くの通信社に送られ、世界中に広がっていく。

例えば、一昨日の『ニューヨーク・タイムズ』で、五年前の今日から始まったイラク戦争を振り返り米国や世界が何を習うべきか、という記事が掲載された。その翌日、予想通りに日本の主流の諸新聞が、それと全く同じ内容の社説を繰り返し掲載した。追加や日本人の立場からの解釈などは一切無い。

よって日本のマスコミのジャーナリストたちは、米国マスコミの直訳者に過ぎないのか、という疑問が否応なしにますます高まっていく。昨日、日本のどの新聞を読んでも、内容は『ニューヨーク・タイムズ』の社説担当記者たち、すなわち新保守派(NEOCON)の、デビッド・ブルックス、リチャード・パール、ジョン・バーンズなど最も熱烈なイラク戦争主戦論者たちが書いた内容と全く同様だった。NHKニュースに出た「政治専門家」と呼ばれる人の分析にも何の違いもなかった。

昨日見たのは、『産経新聞』の「イラク戦争開始五年、習うべきことは何か」だった。まず、アメリカは万能ではない、そして、イラクの国民に対する責任をしっかりと持つ、責任をもつからこそ撤退するわけにはいかない、という主張だった。イラクの国民を裏切ってはならない、という理由を付けて(イラク国民が米国に裏切られたことがないかのように)米軍撤退を拒む。これは一昨日の『ニューヨーク・タイムズ』と同じ主張だ。こういう理屈は、まさにフランスがアルジェリアから、または40年前の米国がベトナムから撤退することを渋った時を彷彿とさせる。帝国主義者の常套手段だ。撤退したらあいつらが混乱状態に陥るから、我らが壊したこの国を救済するために残るのだ、と。

そしてこの『産経』の記事は最後に、占領以来、方針に誤りがあったことを認めなければならない、と主張している。『タイムズ』と同様に、この戦争はそもそも正しかったのか間違っていたのか、犯罪だったのではないか、などという根本的な批判は一切回避。
この米国から渡された物語によれば、侵略したことは当然正しかったが、もう少しイラク国民に抵抗するのを控えてほしかった、というのである。

要するに、テレビも含めて日本の多くのマスコミが報道していることは、アメリカのマスコミや国務省報道官からの発言そのままだ。日本人には分析力、解釈力、自立性は全くないかのようである。

日本の政治やマスコミの問題を巡って、日本の皆さんに改めて慎重に検討してほしい。

(This article was originally posted here at 『ガンジー村通信』)

Saturday, August 23, 2008

Into the Fat After


Sometimes I write poems. Here is the first in a series, collectively titled, Oh, Loiterer. This one I wrote today while watching Blanka Vlasic, Croatian Oympic high jumper. The poem doesn’t really have anything to do with sports, though, or Croatia. It is called, "Into the Fat After." Grammarians be advised that there is some deliberate ungrammatical usage in the poem.

Into the Fat After

You wish I went to the mountain
And dedicated it to you

When all was hierarchical and
And an instinct for salvation purged the mind of dross.

I laughed at your sex's little unguarded follies,
Wandering cuttle-fish of life.

Man, whose convulsions are squelched
Under these long days

That, like a pacifier,
We forever suck on like babies?

See the once-bounding gaiety slink away
As we’re left to pass, together, through today

And into other days,
Where other systems will administer

The evening’s racing through the city
Bluer than any bluefish,

Through the demystified music and solitude
Commonly known as “adulthood”?

Saturday, August 16, 2008

Yasukuni Shrine on the Anniversary of War's End

This just in from Grady Glenn:
I went to the Yasukuni Shrine on Friday to see what all the hubbub was surrounding this sixty-third anniversary of Japan's surrender. I was expecting a little excitement from the uyoku dantai, but I'm afraid they've lost their moxy in recent years.

After listening to a few of their speeches, I realized that their movement lacks two cardinal components: a coherent vision and a charismatic leader who can articulate that vision. Their main complaint this year: "China [or Shina 支那 in their parlance] must stop making rotten gyoza that sickens our nation's valiant young men and virginal maidens!" Not a word about Japan's foreign policy, the "special relationship" with America, their increasing irrelevance on the global stage, or any other real problems.

Apparently last year riots broke out among the police, the uyoku, and the left-wing student groups. This year, only the police and the uyoku showed up, so there was little scuffling. I did get to see some of the Cabinet ministers paying their respects to the dead, but I was too far away to tell which was Abe Shinzo and which was Koizumi Jun'ichiro.

Although I tend to be more sympathetic to expressions of nationalism than your average enlightened Western liberal, on the whole I must say the experience was a bit creepy, especially the part where several hundred crusty seniors strutted out in formation wearing Imperial Japan Army uniforms and armed with bayonets. But as anyone who's recently visited Washington D.C. knows, our war memorials-- especially the newly-added National World War II Memorial that is a testament to our drift toward fascism-- are no less creepy.

Tomorrow I'm off to Sendai, Sakunami, Matsushima, and Yamagata city. In preparation for the trip I'm reading Kirikirijin 『キリギリ人』(1981), Inoue Hisashi's long comic novel written in the Tohoku dialect. Be back next week.

[Note about picture: I think that's me in the far background. Look closely.]

Saturday, August 9, 2008

日本で困ること


海外滞在中の日本人が現地の人に全く同じ質問を何回も聞かれることはよくあるかどうか知らないけども、私は日本に来てから何百回か以下の質問を聞かれた。
    
      「日本で何か困ることはありますか?」

誰に会っても初対面の会話の際、この質問が必ず出てくるが、それは一体なぜなのか。外人に会った時に焦らないためこれを聞きなさい、と小学校の授業で皆が習うのか、としか考えられない。

どう答えれば良いのか、いつも迷ってしまう。知らない漢字は時にある。外人で特別扱いされることも時にあるが、それほど酷い差別ではあるまい。奨学金の金額は最近更に減っているけれども、別段、生活に窮しているわけではない。などと考えながら「いや、ないです」といつもそっけなく答える。

ところが、つねに困っていることがあるとようやく気付いた。

アメリカの町を歩き回っているとき、駐車した車の窓に反映する自分の顔を眺めたり、髪が揃っているのか、変な涎や乾いた歯磨き粉が顔についていないのか、顔の様子をチェックしたりする癖があったのだ。しかし、日本に来てから、それは出来なくなったのだ。日本の停車している車の中に必ず人間がいるからである。止まった車に乗った人は何をしているのか知らないけれども、必ずや誰かが乗っている。不思議なことに。

だから今度、日本で困ることは何かと聞かれたら、車の窓に映る自分の顔が見えないこと、これに一番困っているぞ、と答える。

Friday, August 8, 2008

Ishikawa Jun and the Other Modern (Follow-Up)


Matt asks: "How do you see Sōseki fitting into the Edo vs Meiji takes on modernity, as defined here? Seems to me that he’s big on shabbification, but also pretty invested in realism (at least in certain novels and on certain topics)."

Well, Matt, it’s an interesting question. I wish you’d posted this yesterday before my meeting with my professor, who’s a Sōseki expert of sorts. She’d be able to answer this.

My general impression is that Sōseki lacked the kind of nostalgia for Edo that we see in later writers like Ishikawa Jun and Nagai Kafū. Perhaps he was still too close to the period to feel any nostalgia for it, or perhaps things hadn't gotten that bad yet.

Sōseki did, however, appear to relish his role as critic of modernity (particularly of the Fukuzawan sort), but he seemed to come at it from a different angle. I think he was altogether too stern, ethical, and grandfatherly (even though he died before reaching a grandfatherly age) to enjoy the relatively rowdy and sexualized culture of the Edo plebes. Then again, I could be totally off here.

One example: Sōseki constructs a sort of alternative to the Fukuzawan modern in his novel Kusamakura, in which a first-person narrator leaves the modern city to pursue his solitary, utopian vision of art. But the sources of this vision seem to be Rousseau and the solipsistic Romantics, and the wenren literati of China and Japan, rather than the Edo poets.

But if anyone knows of any instances of him drawing from Edo culture (particularly from the haikai poets), do let me know.

Final note: My apologies for the excessive 渋み of the article! I’ll try to add a little 軽み to the next one!

Thursday, August 7, 2008

暑い日に熱病映画


「コレラの時代の愛」観た。とてもおもしろかった。やっぱりハビエル・バルデムが相当いい俳優だと改めて思った。

マルケスのマジックリアリズム、、、、たしかに1,000人近くもの女性とセックスする、なんて、亡霊が出てくる、とかよりも非現実的かも。

熱病のように一人の女性を愛しつづける、一方で、好色天才ぶりを発揮する側面が、おもしろくてたまらなかった。

おすすめ。

Wednesday, August 6, 2008

Ishikawa Jun and the Other Modern


W. David Marx, editor of the popular online journal Neojaponisme, has kindly invited me to post this article, in full, on his site. In the article, I explore the connection between Ishikawa Jun's "modernist" literature and the literature of the Edo period (1603-1868), particularly of the Tenmei era (1781-1789). This being my second contribution, I need you all to post flattering comments that make me look smarter and cooler than I really am. (Last time they tore me apart!)

Click here for the article.