Saturday, May 31, 2014

PDF of Tsubouchi Shoyo's "The Essence of the Novel" (translated by Nanette Twine)

A slightly more reader-friendly PDF version of N. Twine's translation of Tsubouchi Shoyo's "The Essence of the Novel" (1885-1886). For the original online HTML version, click here.

Study Guide: Ishikawa Jun's "The Structure of Tampen Shōsetsu" (1940)

Thursday, May 29, 2014

Study Guide: Ishikawa Jun’s “The Structure of Tampen Shōsetsu” (1940)

Morrison

Ishikawa Jun’s “The Structure of Tampen Shōsetsu” (1940)[1]

Read the essay and answer the following.

1. Why is Ishikawa reluctant to delve into the question “what is the shōsetsu?” What does he propose to discuss instead?

2. What faults does Ishikawa see in the existing (length-based) taxonomy of shōsetsu? What alternative taxonomy does he propose?

3. Ishikawa asserts that in order to understand what factors determine/limit the length of a work, one must first understand how the work comes into being. Yet this process is rarely, if ever, understood, he argues, due to a certain “common belief” (zokushin). Describe this “common belief.”

4. Ishikawa then contrasts this “common belief” with what he regards as the actual process of how the work comes into being. Describe this process.

5. Ishikawa asserts that the tampen is principally comprised of two forms: the conte and the novella. Describe the elements/qualities/deficiencies of each form, as he sees them. Why does he regard the tampen as inferior to the shōsetsu proper?

6. What does Ishikawa mean when he says “the novel and literature (bungaku) are today pitted against one other in a struggle to the death”? Explain Ishikawa’s particular use of the term bungaku. What larger system is bungaku a part of? How does this system differ from the notion of shōsetsu he is describing/advocating?

7. According to Ishikawa, the process by which the tampen comes into being is the exact opposite of that of the shōsetsu proper. Describe this process. Explain how it differs from that of the shōsetsu proper.

8. How does Ishikawa conceive the role/significance of harmony, the author’s notions/ideas, craftsmanship, and beauty in the two forms of tampen? How are the two forms different from the shōsetsu proper in terms of these four elements/qualities? What negative effect does Ishikawa see “the author’s notions/ideas” as having on the work?

9. Ishikawa dismisses all theories/discussions of the shōsetsu to date as merely “theories of literature” or “theories of the man/author himself.” As he explains: “the sentient pen, the impending darkness, the exertion of seishin (spirit)—these are all missing from the picture.” What does he mean by this? What does Ishikawa regard as the fundamental stumbling block that has prevented critics/writers from recognizing/positing/creating the shōsetsu proper?

10. How does Ishikawa describe the role of the moral in the novella and conte? What kinds of morals are typical in such works, and in what manner are they deployed?

11. What does Ishikawa think of writers who aim to reproduce a “slice of life” in their work? Why does he dismiss theories of writing/criticism that are based on idea of “the eye of the author?” How does this relate to his anti-Naturalist stance?

12. Explain Ishikawa’s particular use of the terms “Art” and “Literature.” What are his motivations for wanting to wrest the shōsetsu from the matrix/system of Art-Literature?

13. Ishikawa claims that the shōsetsu—an invention of modernity—initially went through its own “primitive stage.” What does he mean be this? What new technology came along to push the shōsetsu out of this “primitive phase”? What does he see as the proper role of “the voice/speech” in the shōsetsu?

14. Despite his initial intention to avoid the question “what is the shōsetsu?” Ishikawa repeatedly returns to it throughout the essay—and at the end of the essay he even ventures a definition. What is his definition? How is this definition framed in terms of the shōsetsu as self-reflexive medium?

15. Although Ishikawa believes that no “so-called tampen shōsetsu” can ever attain the status of shōsetsu proper, he does acknowledge that many tampen contain certain “shōsetsu-like parts.” What are these parts? Explain them. How do these parts relate to his notion of “unconscious content,” which he introduced in “Form and Content inWriting”?

16. Explain Ishikawa’s genealogy of the novella, which he sees as having passed through four stages: ninjōbon→“model literature”→the “quasi-Naturalist novel”→the “so-called I-novel.” What Meiji-era literary group made the ninjōbon’s survival possible? What are the essential features shared by these four phases? What permutations occurred in the form’s development? Does Ishikawa regard the final phase—the I-novel—as a sign of progress or decline?

17. In the final paragraph Ishikawa defines the “so-called tampen shōsetsu” as “a middle ground between the two species-concepts of the shōsetsu and literature, and also all of the phenomena of the text that ebbs and surges, appears and disappears, floats and sinks within this middle ground.” Unpack this definition in terms of what he has already discussed.





[1] Tampen shōsetsu no kōsei. First published in March 19, 1940 in Issue 3 of the literary journal Gendai Bunshō Kōza, published by Mikasa shobō 三笠書房. The essay was later included in his book-length work Bungaku taigai文学大概 (September 1942, Shōgakukan 小学館). Translation (by me) forthcoming.

Tuesday, May 27, 2014

Study Guide for “Demon Beasts” (Kichiku 鬼畜, 2002) by Takahashi Gen’ichirō

Morrison

*Purchase my translation of the story in Volume 4 of Monkey Business! Purchase the original story here!

Takahashi Gen’ichirō 高橋源一郎 (1951–): born in Hiroshima. He graduated from a nationally famous prep school and landed a place in Yokohama National University, but his involvement in the student movement led to his withdrawal. He worked in construction for about ten years, during which time he suffered from a kind of aphasia, and it was as a form of rehabilitation that he eventually tried his hand at fiction. In 1981 his debut work, Sayonara gyangu-tachi (Goodbye, Gangsters), received an honorable mention for the Gunzo New Writer Prize for Novel-Length Fiction. In 1988 he won the Mishima Yukio Prize for his novel Yuga de kansho-teki na Nihon yakyu (Japanese Baseball: Elegant and Sentimental). Drawing on material from literature both Eastern and Western as well as from manga and pornography, and displaying a penchant for both parody and pastiche, he has continued to be one of Japan’s leading postmodernists. The novel Nihon bungaku seisuishi (The Rise and Fall of Japanese Literature), based on the struggles of literary giants in the period when modern Japanese literature first took shape, garnered the Ito Sei Prize in 2002; and his collection of stories Sayonora Kurisutofa Robin (Goodbye, Christopher Robin) took the Tanizaki Jun’ichiro Prize in 2012. He is also known as a writer of incisive essays on current events, and as a commentator on horse racing. (Source: J-Lit: Books from Japan)

Study Questions
1. Discuss the character Tanaka. Discuss his background. Discuss his current psychological state.
2. Describe the style of prose.
3. What is the narrative point of view? Where is the focalization point? What narrative techniques are employed in the story (e.g. interior monologue, free indirect speech, etc.)?
4. Describe Tanaka’s first day after being released from prison.
5. What sort of work is Tanaka willing to do? What are his qualifications? What was the result of his first few interviews?

6. Describe the interior/atmosphere of the “swanky office” that Tanaka enters. What is the result of his first conversation with the man at this office?
7. Describe the appearance and demeanor of the man at the office. Describe his tongue.
8. Describe the “tongue splitting” procedure. What is the purpose of this procedure?
9. Describe the appearance of office secretary Maryanne. Describe her tongue.
10. Describe the “tongue lengthening” procedure. What is the purpose of this procedure?

11. What service does this office provide? How does the man describe the concept of “somatic ornamentation aka body modification” to Tanaka? Explain.
12. Do you agree with the concept/practice of “body modification”? Should there be any limits placed on how far we should go with it?
13. Describe the “tongue removal” procedure. What is the purpose of this procedure?
14. Describe the physical appearance of Ken (the young man whose penis is split in two). What act does he in engage in with Maryanne in front of Tanaka? How does Tanaka react?
15. Describe the “penile subincision” procedure. What is the purpose of this procedure?

16. Why does Tanaka talk to his mother in his head? What does he say to his mother?
17. The line between sanity/normal and insanity/abnormal is blurred in this work. Who do you think is on the side of sanity/normality—Tanaka or the office employees?
18. Describe Tanaka’s method for killing each of the office employees. What is his motivation in killing them? How does he justify his act in his mind?
19. Describe the “leg removal” procedure. What is the purpose of this procedure?
20. What do we learn about Tanaka from the following internal dialogue with his mother at the end of the story? How does he justify his previous crime in his mind?

Oh, Mama! These people are demon beasts! No normal person would ever do what they do! What would the world come to if they were allowed to roam free? Don’t you see, Mama? These lunatics are trying to turn the world on its head! It’s like what my doctor told me—you know, that shrink who saw after me in prison. “You’re not a bad man,” he said. “You’re not an animal. You’re not evil. Something just came over you at that instant—a kind of veil fell over your eyes. You had no choice.” Yes, Mama, that’s what he said—and he was right, too. I’m sure of it. How else could I have slit your and Daddy’s and Daisuke’s throats? That wasn’t me then, Mama. That wasn’t my doing. That was some demon beast I didn’t even know. I’m sure of it. Which is why I must see to it that demon beasts like that never roam this earth again. You understand, don’t you, Mama?

21. Discuss the meaning/significance of the story’s title—“demon beasts” (kichiku). Who are the “demon beasts” in the story?
22. Discuss the significance of the two lines at the end of the story: “Suddenly everything came into focus. The veil had been lifted.” What does this “veil” refer to? In what way has it “been lifted”?

Further Group Discussion Questions

1. In what ways are we all a bit like Tanaka? Explain.
2. Where is the story’s climax? How is the structure of this story different from Freytag’s Pyramid?

3. Comment on the violent and sexually explicit episodes/descriptions in the work. What is their overall effect on the reader?

Sunday, May 25, 2014

Study Guide: Ishikawa Jun’s “Form and Content in Writing” (1940)

Morrison

Study Guide: Ishikawa Jun’s “Form and Content in Writing” (1940)[1]

Read the essay and answer the following questions.

1. Ishikawa makes several points about the differences between speech and writing. Identify and explain each of these points. To what does he attribute their fundamental differences?

2. Ishikawa seems to be advocating a notion of writing that is independent from speech. Should we read his commentary as a critique of the notion/practice of genbun itchi? Explain.

3. In what ways has print technology (katsuji) altered our understanding/practice of writing (calligraphy included)? Explain.

4. Describe Ishikawa’s view of kata (fixed models)? What has the impact of kata been on the unfolding/development of writing?

5. How does Ishikawa posit the relation between the particular (i.e. national language) and the universal? What does he see as the two necessary conditions for all written languages? Why doesn’t Esperanto qualify as an authentic language in his view?

6. Consider the final two sentences of the first section. Where does Ishikawa situate “meaning” in relation to “form” and “content”? How does this relate to his general critique of content-centered/representational writing?

When a work is completed, the traces of the struggle of spirit that unfolded there gain autonomy on the page as the image of a living script, and this image is indivisibly related to what the work “means” as a whole. And this image is precisely what constitutes the form of writing.

7. How does Ishikawa’s address the question “what to write and in what manner” (nani o ika ni shite kaku)? How does he respond to some of the conventional answers to this question? What alternative answer does he propose?

8. What does Ishikawa mean when he says “the written word has a pure and simple nature […] insofar as it has washed itself clean of the physiology, the shinri (mind/psychology), and all other aspects and associations of the writer himself”? How does this statement relate to his claim that writing is always already a depersonalized and public act? Furthermore, how might this statement be read as a critique of the Naturalists/I-novelists?

9. How does Ishikawa view the relation between “technique” and “artistic taste”? What point is he trying to make by citing these two passages from Nishikawa Issōtei and George Moore? Does Ishikawa agree with their points?

10. Explain Ishikawa’s view of the (corrupting) influence of poetry on prose writing. What is Ishikawa’s purpose in quoting Pierre Louÿs’ letter to André Gide? How does Ishikawa think writers should deploy rhythm into their writing/sentences?

11. The title of the first section is “That Which Kills Writing/That Which Animates the Writing.” What are the factors that “kill” writing, and what are the factors that “animate” writing, according to Ishikawa?

12. Ishikawa cites three claims made by French naturalist Comte de Buffon (1707-1788): “style is the man himself”; “truth is the only eternal thing”; and “[the infinite number of truths contained in style] are just as useful—and perhaps more useful—to the human spirit than those that make up the subject itself.” Which of the three claims does Ishikawa agree with? What problems does he find in the other two claims? How does this relate to Ishikawa’s general anti-naturalist/nonmimetic orientation?

13. Ishikawa divides all existing writings into two types: “emaciated writing” (hinjaku-gumi) and “insidious writing” (guretsu-gumi). Describe these two types. Can you think of any examples of each type? Which of the two types of writing does Ishikawa regard as superior? 

14. On what grounds does Ishikawa ultimately reject both of these “deformities”—hinjaku-gumi and guretsu-gumi? What alternative “third way” does he propose? Explain.

15. Ishikawa posits that there are two types of content (naiyō): “conscious content” and “unconscious content.” Explain these two types. How are they related? How does this passage relate to Ishikawa’s general anti-content-centric/anti-naturalist orientation?

16. Does Ishikawa think it is possible to write something that is completely free of “conscious content”—that is, which consists only of “unconscious content”? If so, what would this kind of writing look like, and from what source—seishin or shinri—would it spring? Explain. (Note: seishin/spirit and shinri/mentality are key terms in Ishikawa’s lexicon; you will want to pay special attention to these binary terms in his writings.)

17. Explain as much as you can about Ishikawa’s use of the terms “spirit” (seishin) and psyche/mentality (shinri). In what ways is “spirit” antithetical to “psyche/mentality” (shinri)? Which does Ishikawa prefer? How does Ishikawa contrast “spirit” today from what it used to be in the ancient past? How does he describe the interaction between spirit and language/words in this “third way” mode of writing? How does he explain the interaction between spirit and (unconscious) content?

18. What does Ishikawa mean when he says that “conscious content” always exists “avant la lettre”?

19. In what form/medium does Ishikawa expect this “third way” mode of writing to appear?








[1] “Bunshō no keishiki to naiyō”; translation (by me) forthcoming. The essay was first published on May 20 1940 in issue 3 of the journal Gendai Bunshō Kōza (Mikasa shobō), and later included in A General View of Literature (Bungaku taigai; first edition: Shōgakkan, 1942), a book-length collection of essays written between 1936 and 1942.
[2] IJZ, xx, xx; translated by me.

Saturday, May 24, 2014

Study Guide: Ishikawa Jun’s “Form and Content in Writing” (1940)

Study Guide for Tanizaki Jun'ichirō “The Secret” (Himitsu, 1911; translated by A. Chambers)

Morrison
Study Guide for Tanizaki Jun'ichirō “The Secret” (Himitsu, 1911)

“Desire thus does not seek satisfaction; rather, it pursues its own continuation and furtherance—it merely seeks to go on desiring.” -Bruce Fink, A Clinical Introduction to Lacanian Psychoanalysis: Theory and Technique, 51.

*Buy the book here.

I. Terms/Places/Particularities of Culture

1. Literary Aestheticism (tanbi-ha 耽美派): The notion of “art for art’s sake” (l’art pour l’art). A sensibility or philosophy that regards the creation of aesthetic pleasure as the ultimate or proper aim of art. This sensibility/philosophy privileges a non-mimetic, reality-transforming conception of art. In Japan, Tanizaki, Akutagawa, Satō Haruo, Kajii Motojirō, Nagai Kafū, and Edogawa Rampo are most commonly associated with the “movement.” Tanbi-ha writers often trace their influences to fin-de-siècle western literature (e.g. Baudelaire, French Symbolism, Edgar Allen Poe, gothic/late-romantic novels, etc.) that emphasizes the erotic, the exotic, the strange, and the forbidden. Tanbi-ha is sometimes referred to as “diabolism” or akumashugi 悪魔主義.

2. The Asakusa Twelve Story Tower (Ryōunkaku 凌雲閣, or Cloud-Surpassing Pavilion): Japan’s first western-style skyscraper. A large, brick structure that was a major symbol for Asakusa until its collapse in the 1923 earthquake.

3. Asakusa: Center of the old shitamachi (downtown), and the major entertainment district of Edo/Tokyo until the first half of the twentieth century. The area is also known for its various Buddhist temples, the most famous of which is the Sensōji, which is dedicated to the bodhisattva Kannon.

4. Thunder Gate (Kaminari mon): The first of two large torii-style gates leading to the Sensōji in Asakusa. First built in the seventh century, it has long since been the symbol of Asakusa. The rokku or “Sixth District” was famous for its theaters and cinemas.

5. [Add to this list as you read…]

Study Questions

Answer all of the following questions. Each answer should be at least one full paragraph.

1. Describe in detail the tastes, proclivities, desires, and personality traits of the narrator-protagonist. What is he drawn toward? What is he ultimately seeking?

2. Review the above definition of the Aesthetic Movement (tanbi-ha 耽美派). What “aestheticist” qualities do you perceive in this work?

3. Describe the place/neighborhood where the narrator lives. What sort of possessions are scattered about his room? What does this environment that he has chosen/created for himself tell us about him?

4. What does the narrator do every night at nine o’clock? What was his initial motivation for dressing as a woman?

5. The prevailing ethos of the Meiji period was one that stressed and valued lights, brightness, “civilization and enlightenment” (bunmei kaika), science, rationality, fixed gender roles, etc. How might this work—which emphasizes and affirms an opposite set of values—be seen as a challenge to this?

6. Describe the woman. Does she fit into any of Tanizaki’s usual female types?

7. Why does the narrator’s interest in his nightly cross-dressing routine disappear after his unexpected reunion with this woman from his past?

8. Describe the narrator’s perception of the woman and her room during the affair. How does this perception change in the final scene?

9. If Watashi so enjoys the dream world that they have created, why does he try to discover the exact location of her house? In other words, why is he willing to risk puncturing/terminating this dream?

10. Explain why he stops seeing her. What is the work trying to tell us about the nature of [male] desire?

11. Consider the final line of the story: “The satisfactions to be gained from ‘secrets’ were now too bland and pallid for me. I intended to seek more vivid, gory pleasures.” Write a brief summary of a possible sequel to this story.

12. Describe how the work borrows elements from the detective novel, and how Tanizaki appropriates the technique of “ratiocination” which is common in detective novels.

Relevant Terms

1. Ratiocination: (from Latin for “a calculating or thinking”) logical reasoning in steps that argue from induction, deduction, cause-and-effect, definition, comparison, or testimony. The term was first adapted from logic to literature by Coleridge (Literaria Biographia) who referred to the range “of eloquence from the ratiocinative to the declamatory.” (Diction of Poetic Terms, J.E. Myers, et. al., 300)

Monday, May 19, 2014

Study Guide: Takahashi Gen'ichirō 高橋 源一郎: "Goodbye Christopher Robin" (さよならクリストファー・ロビン;初出 2009)

Morrison
Readings in Modern Japanese Fiction

Study Guide
Takahashi Gen’ichirō: “Goodbye, Christopher Robin” (2009)[1]

Takahashi Gen’ichirō 高橋源一郎 (1951) was born in Hiroshima. He graduated from a nationally famous prep school and landed a place in Yokohama National University, but his involvement in the student movement led to his withdrawal. He worked in construction for about ten years, during which time he suffered from a kind of aphasia, and it was as a form of rehabilitation that he eventually tried his hand at fiction. In 1981 his debut work, Sayonara gyangu-tachi (Goodbye, Gangsters), received an honorable mention for the Gunzo New Writer Prize for Novel-Length Fiction. In 1988 he won the Mishima Yukio Prize for his novel Yuga de kansho-teki na Nihon yakyu (Japanese Baseball: Elegant and Sentimental). Drawing on material from literature both Eastern and Western as well as from manga and pornography, and displaying a penchant for both parody and pastiche, he has continued to be one of Japan’s leading postmodernists. The novel Nihon bungaku seisuishi (The Rise and Fall of Japanese Literature), based on the struggles of literary giants in the period when modern Japanese literature first took shape, garnered the Ito Sei Prize in 2002; and his collection of stories Sayonora Kurisutofa Robin (Goodbye, Christopher Robin) took the Tanizaki Jun’ichiro Prize in 2012. He is also known as a writer of incisive essays on current events, and as a commentator on horse racing. (Source: J-Lit: Books from Japan)

Study Questions

1. Identify the narrator(s).
2. Identify/describe each fictional character (old fisherman, wolf, young girl, etc.) and the story he/she is generally associated with; then summarize what happens to him/her.
3. What is the “rumor” referred to on page two?
4. Summarize the episodes involving the astronomer, the physicist, the music lover, the neuroscientist, the head nurse, etc. How do they relate to the main story and its events/themes? Explain the various ways in which the universe is shrinking/disappearing, and the reasons for its shrinking.
5. What are the “two worlds” in the story; how are they related?
6. What is “the nothingness”? What causes it? What can stop it?
7. What is the event that occurred in the other world (referred to as “it” on pages 6-7)?  How does this event affect the characters of “this world”? Summarize the testimonies of those who experienced/witnessed this event.
8. How do the characters resolve to combat the encroaching “nothingness”? What do Winnie-the-Pooh and the others do in order to stay alive?
9. What is the “one last story” that Pooh writes? Might it be the story we are reading?

Further Discussion Questions

10. Is this story an allegory? If so, what represents what (e.g. nothingness= x; shrinking world= y; etc.)?
11. Is our world today—that is, is the social/symbolic order—shrinking? In other words, is the importance of symbols, metaphors, narratives, stories, and so forth diminishing in the modern/contemporary world? If so, what are the likely consequences of this?
12. How does this work challenge the typical worldview of the existentialists? Can this work be read as a critique of existentialism?

Literary Terms/Cultural References

1. Urashima Tarō 浦島太郎: “Legendary character, originating in the Nihon shoki, who was said to have married the female kami of water, Oto-hime, in 478. He saved Oto-hime when she was resting on a beach in the form of a turtle. Transforming herself into a ravishing young woman, she took him to her father's underwater palace, where she married him. After three years of happiness, he wanted to return to land. Oto-hime let him go, but gave him a box containing the years of his life. When he returned home, Urashima Tarō could not keep himself from opening the box. His years quickly fled, and he died instantly of old age. In some versions of this tale, Urashima Tarō is called Shima no Ko or Urashima no Ko. It is a Japanese version of Rip van Winkle, and its adventures were the subject of a Noh play called Urashima and many otogi-zōshi tales.” (Louis-Frederic Japan Encyclopedia 1016).

2. Allegory: an extended metaphor; allegories are comprised of structural (rather than textual) symbolism. In an allegory the characters/action/events/scenery corresponds more or less directly to certain spiritual/political/psychological struggles.




[1] The original story was published in December 2009; a translation is forthcoming.

Study Guide: Takahashi Gen'ichirō 高橋 源一郎: "Goodbye Christopher Robin" (さよならクリストファー・ロビン;初出 2009)

Tuesday, May 13, 2014

Monday, May 12, 2014

Murakami Haruki "Sleep" (Nemuri; 初出1989)

Morrison: Readings in Japanese Literature

Murakami Haruki: “Sleep”[1]

*To purchase Jay Rubin's translation of the story, click here

Study Questions


1. Describe the narrator’s first bout of insomnia. How long did it last? How did it end?
2. Describe the narrator’s current condition of sleeplessness. How does it differ from her prior experience with insomnia?
3. Describe the husband, and the narrator’s relationship with him. Is his “featureless” face (77) indicative of something?
4. Describe the narrator’s daily routine.
5. The narrator says that deep within her there exists something “very important to me,” which she does not “want to lose” (80). What do you think this “something” is? Explain.
6. The narrator seems to have a good, conventional life—yet something is missing. What exactly is missing, in your view?


7. Describe the narrator’s first sleepless night.
8. Describe the strange vision she has, which prompts her into a state of sleeplessness. What does the old man with the water pitcher represent?
9. Compare and contrast the old narrator (i.e. the narrator in her college days; pp. 87-88) with the recent narrator (i.e. the narrator in her family life; pp. 78-81). What has changed in her life? How has she changed? What has she lost?
10. Describe in detail the narrator’s metamorphosis.


11. What does the narrator learn at the library about the connection between “sleep” and “tendencies”? Explain her “new determination” after leaving the library.
12. Describe the narrator’s feelings toward her husband after her “metamorphosis.” Why does she feel this way?
13. Discuss the ending (106-109). Who are the “two men—the dark shadows—[who] keep shaking my car”?
14. Identify a line or passage that you feel is especially significant to the overall theme of the story. Explain its significance to your group.

Further Discussion Topics

The narrator’s “authentic” act: is it regressive or progressive? Will it ultimately/necessarily lead to alienation/death? 
Is she a female Übermensch? 
Consider story in context of Heidegger’s notion of “authenticity.” 
Consider the role/function of death in the work.
   







[1] First published in Bungakukai (January 1989). Translated by Jay Rubin. Included in The Elephant Vanishes.

Thursday, May 8, 2014

"Kajin" (The Nymphs). By Ishikawa Jun. Translated by me. Read by YakItToMe.

Author: 石川淳
Original Title: 「佳人」
Translator: Me
Original Publication: 『作品』 1935
Translation: Included in appendix of my dissertation; to be published in near future.
Read by: Yakitome, Voice of the Web.

Wednesday, May 7, 2014

"Eri’s Physics." By Hayasuke Yōko. Translated by me. Read by YakItToMe.

Author:  早助よう子
Original Title: 「エリちゃんの物理」
Translator: Me
Journal: Monkey Business Volume 4
Read by: Yakitome, Voice of the Web.
Subject: Life in the wake of the 2011 Tōhoku earthquake and tsunami.

Click here to purchase Volume 4 of Monkey Business!

Thursday, May 1, 2014

"Yamazakura" (The Wild Cherry Tree). By Ishikawa Jun. Translated by me. Read by YakItToMe.

Author: 石川淳
Original Title: 「山桜」
Translator: Me
Original Publication: 『文芸汎論』 January 1937
Translation: Included in appendix of my dissertation; to be published in near future.
Read by: Yakitome, Voice of the Web.

The Wild Cherry Tree